solar glassesNorth Ga. – On Monday, Aug. 21, Georgia will be among 14 states to experience a total eclipse of the sun. The Georgia Department of Public Health reminds those who will watch the solar eclipse that it’s never safe to look directly at the sun, or eye damage may occur. 

Viewing the solar eclipse should be done through “eclipse glasses” that meet the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard. See the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers for a list of dealers of eclipse glasses. To find out which libraries near you are distributing free eclipse glasses, see the library map on the STAR_Net website.

Retinal damage to eyes may occur while attempting to stare at the sun. Solar retinopathy is a result of too much ultraviolet light flooding the retina. Never look directly at the sun without proper protection – using ISO 12312-2 lenses. If you damage your eyes trying to view the solar eclipse, please contact your healthcare provider.

NASA’s additional recommendations for safe eclipse viewing are:

  • Stand still, and put on your eclipse glasses before looking up at the eclipse. Turn away to remove your eclipse glasses — do not remove them while looking at the sun.   

  • Do not look at the eclipse through a camera, a telescope or binoculars while using your eclipse glasses — the sun will damage the filter and your eyes.

  • Always inspect your eclipse glasses before use; if scratched or damaged, do not use.

  • Supervise children viewing the eclipse.

  • Remove your eclipse glasses only when the moon completely covers the sun and it gets dark. Then, as soon as the sun begins to reappear, put your eclipse glasses back on.

The last time the U.S. saw a total eclipse was 1979. During this year’s eclipse, the moon will fully block the sun for two minutes and 40 seconds. Only the northeast corner of Georgia will experience this; the rest of the state will see a partial eclipse. The moon will pass between the Earth and the sun, blocking all or part of the sun, for up to three hours.     

Learn more about safely viewing the solar eclipse at: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety.

 

Safety tips for viewing the 2017 solar eclipse


  • It’s never safe to look directly at the sun, or eye damage may occur. 

  • Viewing the solar eclipse should be done through “eclipse glasses” that meet the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard.

  • See the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers for a list of dealers of eclipse glasses.

  • To find out which libraries near you are distributing free eclipse glasses, see the library map on the STAR_Net website.  

  • Retinal damage to eyes may occur while attempting to stare at the sun.

  • Solar retinopathy is a result of too much ultraviolet light flooding the eye’s retina.

  • If you damage your eyes trying to view the solar eclipse, please contact your healthcare provider.


NASA’s additional recommendations for safe eclipse viewing are:


  • Stand still, and put on your eclipse glasses before looking up at the eclipse. Turn away to remove your eclipse glasses — do not remove them while looking at the sun.  

  • Do not look at the eclipse through a camera, a telescope or binoculars while using your eclipse glasses — the sun will damage the filter and your eyes.

  • Always inspect your eclipse glasses before use; if scratched or damaged, do not use.

  • Supervise children viewing the eclipse. 

  • Remove your eclipse glasses only when the moon completely covers the sun, and it gets dark. Then, as soon as the sun begins to reappear, put your eclipse glasses back on. 


Learn more about safely viewing the total eclipse at: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety.

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